RESTORATION

Facts

 

• The Cross Timbers Eco-Region

is important as resting, nesting, feeding or roosting for birds and wildlife.

 

• Wildlife also abounds. This area is home to deer, fox, bobcat

coyote, beaver, wild turkey and many more. See our TC wild caught on wildlife cameras >

 

• Native grasses include: little bluestem (below), big bluestem,  indiangrass and switchgrass (the Big 4 Tall Prairie Grasses).

 


 

• Birds that habitat the region year round are: hawk, owl, great blue heron, indigo bunting, dickcissel, and various waterfowl

and shorebirds. See more >

 

 

 

 

When Visiting

 

To protect the area’s

natural beauty,

to preserve the life sustaining environment for animals,

and so other people

can enjoy the TCPCA experience, please leave all natural objects in place,

including wild flowers.

 

Thank you!

 

 

 

Map courtesy www.epa.gov

THE CROSS TIMBERS REGION

 

 

The Cross Timbers Region starts in Southeast Kansas, bisecting the prairies, ending in central Texas. Trophy Club Park is a small part of what was approximately 11 million acres of the Cross Timbers ecological zone. The Town of Trophy Club has leased the park (TCP) from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and it is by their authority that we have the privilege to use it.

 

Cross Timbers and surrounding prairies were once home to at least two Native American tribes, the Kiowa and the Commanche, before settlers arrived in the early 1800’s. The Native Americans utilized both the flora and fauna of the region in very efficient ways in order to sustain themselves.

 

 

 

 

Much of the native forest still survives, and is largely comprised of mature native species. The two predominate trees are the post oak and the blackjack oak. The pecan is also abundant and has always played a very important part in Texas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wildflowers bloom much of the year: Indian blanket,

horsemint, false foxglove and prairie verbena are a few.

 

Denton Creek (top left) and

Marshall Creek (bottom left)

run through the eco-region and

the park. These waterways are

environmentally sensitive and

feed into Grapevine Lake to

provide drinking water for

surrounding areas.

Keep Trophy Club Wild, Inc.

PO Box 1104 • Trophy Club, Texas 76262

Email:  info@keeptrophyclubwild.com

 

©2014 Keep Trophy Club Wild. All Rights Reserved.

Site designed & maintained by DMP Publishing.

Home  |   Mission   |   Plans   |   Area Map  |  Volunteer & Membership   |   Donate   |   Events   |   Affiliations   |   Contact Us